Hurricane Matthew Headed Toward NC

Hurricane Matthew Headed Toward NC

It looks like Hurricane Matthew is headed our way. This is a large hurricane that covers a lot of area. This hurricane has a tropical storm-force wind field (at least 39 mph sustained winds) that currently extends over 300 miles wide. Hurricane-force winds extend up to 40 miles from the eye of Hurricane Matthew. Landfall may take place between the South Carolina and the North Carolina border by weeks end. Predictions are for the hurricane that is now a Cat 4 to be a Cat 2 or even a Cat 3 when it reaches the Carolinas. Recent rain has made the rivers and creeks already full in NC. If Hurricane Matthew brings a lot of rainand strong winds as anticipated then we need to prepare now for more flooding.

 

Hurricane Matthew Headed to NC

Hurricane Matthew Headed to NC

Pay close attention to the news and weather forecast to keep up to date on Hurricane Matthew and how it will impact North Carolina. Travel in and around the state on Friday, Saturday and possibly Sunday may be dangerous. There is the potential for flooding, downed trees, structural damage and loss of power. Preparations have already begun in the coastal communities. Hurricane Watches and Warning will likely be posted on Thursday if not before.

Consider planning now to prepare for this powerful hurricane. Go ahead and make sure you have batteries, candles, bottled water and food that will not need refrigeration just in case electrical power is lost. Heavy rain and windy conditions are expected starting as early as Friday and lasting into Saturday and maybe even Sunday as this slow moving hurricane travels up the eastern coast of the United States. Please stay safe. Be aware of weather conditions and forecasts for North Carolina, especially if you have plans to travel. This storm may impact the NC mountains and fall foliage.

Please use our live NC  web cams page to see conditions across the state. From the coast to the mountains our live web cam links can offer real-time weather conditions in North Carolina.

Remember that most deaths occur after a storm. If you a approach a flooded road

Turn Around, Don’t Drown.

 

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